Activist Deepak Kabir’s wife says he was arrested for asking about missing protesters, claims he is paying price for confronting injustice

Anti-CAA protests: Activist Deepak Kabir’s wife says he was arrested for asking about missing protesters, claims he is paying price for confronting injustice – Firstpost

Deepak Kabir was reportedly assaulted by half a dozen police officers who hit him with batons and rifle butts for trying to speak up for the arrested protesters. The 48-year-old had reached the Hazratganj Police station in Lucknow at 10 am on 20 December to find out about Jafar and other missing protesters. However, the police detained him and allegedly assaulted him.

Why This Indian State Is Witnessing the Most Violent Citizenship Act Protests

Why This Indian State Is Witnessing the Most Violent Citizenship Act Protests

On Wednesday, cries of “kagaz nahin dikhayenge” (we wont show papers), “Tanasahi nahin chalegi” (we won’t allow dictatorship) rang out at the iconic India Gate in Delhi as protesters took a pledge to defend the constitution and continue to oppose Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s new citizenship law. Thousands of Indians brought in the New Year on Tuesday night with protests all over the country. Social media buzzed with protest notes and invitations to demonstrations at midnight.

Not Modi’s India Anymore

Not Modi’s India Anymore

By Nilanjana Bhowmicknewint.org — 6 January 2020Ongoing countrywide protests are rooted in a battle for India’s secular values, argues Nilanjana Bhowmick. Demonstrators attend a protest against a new citizenship law, outside the Jamia Millia Islamia university in New Delhi, India, January 1, 2020. REUTERS/Anushree FadnavisA 31-year-old Muslim woman, Bijoli Bano ekes out a living as a domestic worker in the satellite town of Noida in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, while her husband works as a driver.

The invisible green warriors

View From India (New Internationalist Magazine)

Nilanjana Bhowmick heralds India’s most overshadowed environmentalists: waste-pickersRag pickers collect recyclable material at a garbage dump in New Delhi November 19, 2014. REUTERS/Ahmad Masood Old Indian homes from the country’s colonial past – often raved about in style glossies – usually have elegant, long, spiralling iron stairs at the back. These were meant for the sweepers or the waste pickers, mostly from the lower castes (the dalits or so-called ‘untouchables’), to use to collect waste.

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How women in India demanded—and are getting—safer streets

India’s urban women have long risked harm just by walking down the street. Now there are signs of progress, in burgeoning programs to make spaces safer and increase penalties for assailants. This feature explores the steps taken by local Indian women to lessen horrific crimes and keep them safe.

READ THE ARTICLE HERE

(This appears in The November issue of Nat Geo Magazine, which kicks off the magazine’s yearlong celebration of women who fearlessly push boundaries and inspire the next generation of changemakers. This is the first ever issue written and photographed exclusively by women)